Southampton Protestation Return, 1641.
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Southampton Protestation Return, 1641.

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Published by Barry Chinchen in (Eastleigh) ((97 Chamberlayne Rd, Eastleigh, Hants.)) .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Allegiance -- England -- Southampton.,
  • Church and state -- Church of England.,
  • Protestants in Hampshire, Eng.

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsGreat Britain. Parliament. House of Lords. Record Office.
The Physical Object
Pagination(2),14 leaves ;
Number of Pages14
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21672983M

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The returns relate to the years 42, around the start of the Civil Protestation was an Oath of loyalty to Parliament and to the King, and was originally drawn up and taken by the members of the House of Commons on 3rd of May , the following day the protestant Peers in the House of Lords also swore it. brampford speke - the protestation return of /2 By the end of , King Charles I had become very unpopular. Parliament forced him to make changes in the Constitution which gave them a bigger say in how the country was governed.   Lists of those taking the oath in each parish were sent to Parliament in Most men took the oath and those who refused to sign (mostly Catholics) were sometimes also listed. The Protestation Return’ for Monkwearmouth taken on 24 February, are set out below. Protestation Returns Transcribed from original returns on microfilm by Tony Higgins. (Note: Ornate letters and unusual spellings introduce uncertainties.) T he English Revolution () began in November when Charles 1st. summoned Parliament to .

The Protestation Oath of Vow and Protestation." On the 6th May a Bill was introduced in the House of Commons imposing the signing of the Protestation on all Englishmen of 18 years and above. All who refused to sign were deemed unfit to hold office in Church or Commonwealth. THE PROTESTATION PROTESTED, AND DAVID CRESSY. The Ohio State University. ABSTRACT. Parliament's Protestation of May pledged subscribers to defend the protestant doctrine of the Church of England against all popery and popish innovations, while upholding the honour of the king, the privileges of parliament, and the liberties ofthe. The Protestation Return for Devon, Some men did not sign the Protestation themselves: (Westerne, John, Westerne, John and Westerne, Thomas) Richard Maunder being sick took and acknowledged the protestation the same day and year at home in his bed before Andrew Hosegood, constable and John Waterman, churchwarden. The Protestation Returns, , and Other Contemporary Listings: Collection in Aid of Distressed Protestants in Ireland; Subsidies; Poll Tax; Assessment Or Grant; Vow and Covenant; Solemn League and Covenant Guides for Genealogists, Family, and Local Historians: Authors: Jeremy Sumner Wycherley Gibson, Alan Dell: Compiled by.

It was agreed and ordered on the 3rd May , that every Member of the House of Commons should make a protestation (declaration of loyalty), which the House of Lords also agreed to the following day. The Commons then ordered the printing of the protestation and preamble on the 5th May , and the Members distributed it to their Counties. For an explanation of the background please read the Protestation Oath; The source for this transcription is "Cornwall Protestation Returns " from a transcript (circa ) by Reginald Morshead Glencross, additional material by H L Douch, edited and published by T L Stoate ; The wildcard (%) is applied by default to the right hand side of some search terms. Stalbridge: Protestation Returns Transcribed from original returns on microfilm by Tony Higgins. (Note: Ornate letters and unusual spellings introduce uncertainties.) The English Revolution () began in November when Charles 1st. summoned Parliament to help him out of a financial crisis. Somerset Protestation Returns. Transcribed by Originally Published by The Protestation Returns owe their origin to the troubled times preceding the Civil War. In May members of both Houses of Parliament took an oath protesting their loyalty to the Church of England, the King and “the Powers and Privileges of.